Making noise and empowering girls: 15 years of Women’s Audio Mission

By Joanna Ladd : 48hills – excerpt (includes video)

Founder Terri Winston speaks about educating young women in recording studio technology—and WAM’s big fundraising bash, coming September 21.

ALL EARS For 15 years, the sound engineers at SoMa neighborhood-based Women’s Audio Mission have been applying their skills to one of the field’s trickiest problems: how to get girls involved in STEM. (That’s Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math, for you English majors out there.) WAM, a pitch-perfect acronym, is a professional recording studio, run entirely by women, that doubles as a playground where 1500 girls and women a year learn how to create the media they consume every day. Terri Winston, WAM’s founder and executive director, is an electrical engineer who designed the studio and much of the recording equipment herself. She laughs while revealing the simple hack that all the adults in STEM seem to keep missing: “You guys aren’t even talking to the girls.”

On September 21, WAM celebrates its 15th anniversary with—what else?—a benefit concert at the Brava Theater, which shares WAM’s mission to support women in the arts. Winston asked the luminous duo St. Beauty to headline the event, after she and her students were invited to the soundcheck for Janelle Monae’s Dirty Computer tour and were blown away by St. Beauty’s opening set. The Bay Area’s own Diana Gameros will start the evening with a set of traditional Mexican songs that she recorded at WAM last year. Proceeds from the event will fund WAM’s expansion to a new location in Oakland, where they expect to double the number of girls they reach.

In WAM’s gadget-filled studio, Winston mapped out how she became a sound engineer at a time when training programs like WAM didn’t exist. It takes a special kind of brain to see building a recording studio from scratch as the simplest way to fix intractable gender bias. Fortunately, Winston’s path started in the same sort of technology wonderland that she has created for her students…(more)

 

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Cannabis Makes its Official Outside Lands Debut

By Amy Copperman : hightimes – excerpt

For the first time, cannabis became part of the official lineup at San Francisco’s Outside Lands Festival this weekend—kind of. Grass Lands, the first-ever curated cannabis experience to hit a mainstream festival, set up shop in a sprawling woodland fairyland overlooking the festival’s main stage. However, regulations forbid the sale of Grass Lands’ star—ironic considering vape clouds throughout Golden Gate Park on any given day roll about as thick as San Francisco’s August fog, especially since marijuana became legal recreationally at the beginning of this year.

So what do you do at a cannabis event that doesn’t actually feature its headliner? It turns out a lot, thanks to the creativity and ingenuity of the mostly local brands that paid homage to cannabis education, sustainability, and San Francisco as the birthplace of the medical marijuana movement… (more)

RELATED:

Bands mix music and politics at San Francisco’s Outside Lands festival

Amid the tens of thousands of people who attended the 11th annual Outside Lands music festival in San Francisco’s Golden Gate park this weekend, one face stood out, two-dimensionally speaking: Barack Obama’s… (more)

Outside Lands 2018 gets political as Gavin Newsom talks Trump

Outside Lands is known for its world-famous music headliners, food and drink vendors and foggy, chilly weather. But this year, the San Francisco festival added another new element: politics.

California gubernatorial candidate Gavin Newsom appeared Saturday, Aug. 11, on the Barbary stage as part of a new talk series called D.A.V.E., for Discussions About Virtually Everything. Newsom, currently California lieutenant governor and a former San Francisco mayor, talked with Wired magazine co-founder John Battelle about state issues such as the homelessness and housing crises, sanctuary cities, the water shortage and education… (more)

Its’s a sign of the times: Sex and Drugs and Rockn’Roll has been replaced by Politics and Drugs and Rockn’Roll.

San Francisco’s dearly departed nightclubs and music venues

By Amy Graff : sfgate – excerpt

How much would you pay to hop into a time machine and visit San Francisco’s long-gone Winterland Ballroom on Jan. 14, 1978, the night of the Sex Pistols’ last performance before the legendary punk band’s big breakup?

Johnny Rotten addressed the crowd hollering “Welcome to London,” and then he and his mates launched into a blitzed take on “God Save the Queen.”…

Winterland is one of the city’s many nightclubs and music venues that hosted golden music moments and great jam sessions before disappearing from the scene.

Many of us grew up throwing ourselves into mosh pits and twirling ourselves into oblivion in the ’60s, ’70s and ’80s at these places, filling the memories of our youth in a freer, more vibrant and experimental San Francisco. In the gallery above, we pay tribute to some of our favorites with help from the recollections of the San Francisco Remembered Facebook group(more)

Of course Pinellas County lost Beaux Arts, the home to decades of art, poetry, politics, and underground films, fun and games for adults and wayward teens. Culture is killed by the society it tries to describe. Artists are left on their own to figure out how to move on. We dubbed it “culture clash”.

 

Will the unique culture of Miami’s Coconut Grove survive?

By Suzette Laboy, Associated Press : sfchronicle – excerpt

MIAMI (AP) — With its artsy vibe, lush landscapes and free-roaming peacocks, Coconut Grove has long been known as a bohemian paradise.

It’s also Miami’s oldest neighborhood, established along the shores of Biscayne Bay in 1873 before the city existed. Located nearly 5 miles from what is now Miami’s downtown, its streets are shaded by thick canopies of trees and its housing stock includes some of Miami’s oldest homes.

But as new architecture goes up and its business district revitalizes, Coconut Grove is at risk of losing its unique history and tropical culture. Older homes are being turned into mansions of concrete and glass. Locals are fighting to reduce the size of new construction and preserve green space…

orge Perez, one of the most influential names in Miami real estate, has called Coconut Grove home for over 35 years and says he’s committed to maintaining its historic charm. His company, The Related Group, along with The Terra Group, are behind the new Park Grove project, a 297-unit luxury condo development on the Coconut Grove waterfront. The project features three wavy towers, a restaurant and “lush landscaping that the Grove is known for,” Perez says, along with a park “filled with sculptures that will be very much in the spirit of the Grove.”…(more)

Coconut Grove was one of the choice distinations for Beaux Artists leaving Pinellas Park for greener pastures. They found friendly open-hearted fun-loving easy-going creative spirits there.

Now the Grove is facing the same devastation all cities are as unfriendly groups like The Related Group bring their bag of tricks to gentrify the neighborhoods they want to overtake. One of their tricks is to make deals with local governments to replace public parking with bike rental stations to gentrify neighborhoods.

Don’t know how successful they will be getting people out of their air-conditioned cars in Florida, but I’m sure they will try. I’m also sure the Coconut Grove folks will fight back to preserve what they love the same way we all do.

 

 

Summer of Love concert promoter won’t give up — seeks ballot measure

By Sam Whiting : sfchronicle – excerpt

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Promoter Boots Hughston, rejected over and over by the San Francisco Recreation and Park Commission in his bid to stage a free 50th Anniversary Summer of Love Concert in Golden Gate Park last summer, is now planning to take it to the voters and stage it for the 52nd anniversary…

“No Cost Permit for Summer of Love Anniversary Concert” is the title. If a simple majority of voters approve, the concert will be held in September 2019.

“We are talking about calling it ‘The 50th Anniversary of Woodstock featuring the Summer of Love’,” Hughston said. The initiative calls for Hughston and his organization, the Council of Light, to hold a free event with no fences at the Polo Field in Golden Gate Park. There will be 26 or 27 bands and 17 featured speakers. He expects the crowd to be 70,000 — minimum…

As part of the initiative Hughston has asked that all permit, inspection, landscape and management fees for the event be waived.

“The Summer of Love is an earmark for our generation,” Hughston said. “We are in our 70s and our 80s and we saved the world. We should be able to do one last big show and promote peace, love and compassion.”… (more)

One last attempt at one last bash for freedom peace and love before we throw in the towel on San Francisco’s role in history. Will these San Francisco residents support a “free” historical event to honor the fearless freedom fighters who got us where we are today, with our legal buds?

Lessons from Stop the Draft Week 50 years ago

In 1967, protesters filled the streets of Oakland to stop the draft. Seven faced serious charges — and their message still resonates today

With great fanfare PBS is airing a 10-part series about the Vietnam War. Critics charge that under the guise of being even handed, series producers Ken Burns and Lynn Novick say the US and Vietnam share equal blame for the war. Foreign correspondent  Reese Erlich offers a different historical perspective.

October marks the 50th anniversary of Stop the Draft Week, the largest militant anti-Vietnam War demonstration up to that time. Ten thousand people jammed into the streets of downtown Oakland to shutdown the federal draft induction center.

Demonstration organizers, who became known as the Oakland 7, faced an 11-week conspiracy trial. In a major victory for the anti-war movement, a jury acquitted them of all charges…

In October of 1967, the U.S. war effort in Vietnam was failing. In just a few months, Vietnamese rebels launched the Tet Offensive, a political defeat that proved to be a turning point in the US war.

Throughout 1967 President Lyndon Johnson sent more troops to South Vietnam, and that required bigger draft calls. The sons of the very rich and well connected always avoided the draft. Donald Trump received a medical deferment due to “bone spurs” in his heels. They didn’t prevent him from a lifetime of skiing, however…

We didn’t consider ourselves hippies, but the anti-war and counterculture movements were intertwined. Both groups used drugs, listened to rock, dressed unconventionally and engaged in the kind of sex that outraged our parents. But hippies tended to protest society by “dropping out.” We wanted them to “drop in” to the anti-war movement.

We also sought to broaden the anti-war movement by including workers and allying with black, Latino, and Asian activists. Dave Harris and his pacifist allies believed they could do that with an appeal to conscience and traditional, nonviolent tactics.

Others of us argued that working class youth were turned off by traditional pacifism. It was time that anti-war demonstrators become more militant and defend ourselves against police attack.

Our call for militant action was hugely controversial. Of course local politicians, university administrators and business people were opposed. But even most leaders of the mainstream peace movement were hesitant. Our rejection of non-violent tactics ran against the grain of protests at that time. Few leaders and no traditional peace groups endorsed STDW.

But we picked up grassroots support. I still remember walking the streets of Berkeley in early October and seeing scores of houses displaying Stop the Draft Week posters in their windows.

Our timing was spot on. “Our political antennae picked up something out there,” Oakland 7 member Terry Cannon told me years later… (more)

How the mighty have fallen. An unofficial Summer of Love celebration did squeak by with little fanfare in the fall of 2017 in the San Francisco Golden Gate Park Bandshell, with Wavy Gravy and some die hard local bands and their fans.
It is a sad day when San Francisco officials nix the 50th anniversary Summer of Love concert that ushered in the peace movement, especially now that we are dealing with a clash of cultures and political upheaval.
To add insult to injury, Silicon Valley officials and the 49ers Management want to extend a 10 PM noise curfew to allow for later performances to make up for the poor ticket sales at Levis Stadium. Money is king in the the former home of the peace and love movement.
Pay to play or just pay, as California turns itself into the most valuable real estate with the highest rate of poverty and one of the worst education systems in the country.

 

Danny Kalais

Kalais.jpg

Danny Kalais performing at Beaux Arts and in his youth at high school. These photos came from the Beaux Arts Collection.

One of the musicians I missed at Beaux Arts was Danny Kalais. Many believed him to be the most creative and talented musician they knew. He had a rather large fan club. This links to the Danny Kalais page: http://www.beauxartsbook.com/Music/Kalais.html

Danny had a daughter with his wife Cheri who never knew him. His daughter, Kim Kerson discovered the Beaux Arts connection and contacted me in hopes of learning more about her parents. I put her in touch with Lynch French, who called Dan Finley. I am sure she would like to hear from others who were close to her parents.

We are so happy to help people connect.

Hi

My name is Kim Kerson. I was born in 1967 and given up for adoption.I have been searching for information on my biological parents for a very long time. I was recently matched to a 1st cousin (Daniel Wiley Kalais’s half sibling, Wanda Heisel) through Ancestry DNA, and found out that I may be the daughter of Daniel Wylie Kalais and Cheryl Dawn Chisholm. Unfortunately his half sister is quite a bit older than him (approaching 89)…and the only information I have found out is through her daughter who did not know him too well. I have learned that he passed away in 1996. I would really like to get to know him…I am hoping that you might have some stories to share or could point me to some of the people that may have known him and are willing to share some stories with me. It would be greatly appreciated!

Sincerely,

Kim Kerson
kersonkim@gmail.com

Llyn’s response:

THANK YOU SOOOOOO MUCH!!!! As soon as I got your e-mail, I called Kim. What a miracle!
 
Cheri Dawn and I were pregnant together. My daughter was born 4/29/67 and Kim was born in June. Danny & Cheri were married but just not in any condition to take parental responsibility and (sadly but wisely) had Kim adopted. She said that overall, her adoptive parents were okay. I’ve told her all I know; sent her a photo of Danny from our high-school yearbook and the lyrics to Danny’s song “You Got to Keep Your Madness Magic”; what I and then Nano Riley posted on the Beaux Arts Book Web site about Danny; a newspaper article that I wrote about the Beaux that described Cheri; and info from Dan “Panama Red” Finley, who was in touch with Cheri until she passed on and has some photos if he can find them. I’ll soon send her more from my Beaux history folder. I also sent the lyrics of “Bob Dylan’s Dream” and the following quote:

“Medicine Crow is Tlingit and Haida from Kake. She told a story about a lesson she learned from Polynesian navigators. “The traditional practice of sailing by the stars requires that they set their bow looking forward but they are navigating from the stars behind them because from that they can know the direction their bow is going. I think that is such a powerful analogy about the way our ancestors think about time. And the way we should think about it, too.” “

There’s no getting around it, Danny was the most talented and charismatic of us. To quote Kerouac:
“The only people for me are the mad ones, the ones who are mad to live, mad to talk, mad to be saved, desirous of everything at the same time, the ones who never yawn or say a commonplace thing, but burn, burn, burn, like fabulous yellow roman candles exploding like spiders across the stars…”
Every one of us still standing says, “Yes. That was Danny Kalais.” Yes!
Thank you so much, Mari!!!! What a blessing that this child has come home!!!!

Llyn

Dan Finley talked with Cheri Dawn’s husband, Richard Doyle, of Santa Teresa, NM.
Finley’s Facebook page is under his stage name & nickname “Panama Red.” For many years, Finley has been Facebook-friends with Cheri Dawn and her husband, Richard Doyle of Santa Teresa, NM. This morning Finley contacted Richard. Cheri died of cancer on March 22, 2013. Richard’s Facebook page is titled “Richard Doyle” and his Intro says he is “Chairman & CEO at “Dawn Chisolm-Doyle Music Scholarship Fund“…” Richard told Finley that he has known that Cheri had a daughter with Kalais who was adopted out at birth. Richard said that Kim is welcome to get in touch with him. Richard can be contacted through his facebook page.