“Gem of the South” Veronika Jackson


message from Veronica Jackson

It is so nice to be contacting you again, after being out of touch for a while. I hope all is well with you. I have been performing and keeping alive the grassroots music of American folk blues. As an artist who enjoys performing and entertaining music lovers from all walks of life. Please visit website for future performances. See you around the festivals and music rooms!

Veronika Jackson
contact @ VeronikaJackson.com

Pipeline Fighters

By Marino Colmano : grandintheatre – excerpt

This is a FREE event sponsored by Preserve Giles County, Preserve Roanoke County and Preserve Franklin County.  There will be a Q & A session afterwards with the sponsors and the filmmaker.

Pipeline Fighters voice their opposition to interstate pipelines in the Virginias for the transport of fracked gas to export terminals, and abroad. Natural gas procured through unconventional hydraulic fracturing, has been the gold rush of the last decade. Pipelines are needed to move this massive glut of natural gas. Through the voices of the Appalachian people we explore in microcosm the global issue of environmental predation, the legacy of the energy industry, their current production goals to DOUBLE the development of natural FRACKED gas coming out of the Appalachian Basin, and the great relevance this has on the geo political scene and climate change…(more)

Director/Director: Marino Colmano
All the media coverage on pipeline opposition has been concentrated on the Standing Rock lately. This is a reminder that many other states have citizens who oppose the proliferation of pipelines near their sources of drinking water as well. Many rivers and tributaries downstream from coal ash disposal sites have been contaminated by spills and some communities have been covered in ash:
A Brief History of U.S. Coal Ash Since the Kingston Spill

UC Berkeley ponders People’s Park for housing in controversial move

By Nanette Asimov< : sfchronicle – excerpt

People’s Park near UC Berkeley, where questions over its fate have inspired student protests for decades and led deputies to kill a man and blind another on infamous “Bloody Thursday” in 1969, is again being considered for development.

This time, UC Berkeley is eyeing the grassy 2.8-acre park as one of nine sites for development to alleviate one of the worst shortages of student housing in campus history…

Another great park up for grabs with a ton of history some want to bury. The Grateful Dead and Country Joe and the Fish among many others played here for free long before they were discovered. Many battles were fought to preserve this park.

Last photos I shot of the Pinellas site.

This brings up a question about the old Beaux Arts site. Is it still a park as it was last time I was there or has the city developed it?

A $2.5 trillion asset manager just put a statue of a defiant girl in front of the Wall Street bull

By Rachael Levy : sfgate – excerpt (includes video)

“Who ‘s that girl standing in front of the Wall Street bull?

There’s a new girl in town, and she’s staring down the charging bull. A bronze statue, known as “Fearless Girl,” was installed by State Street Global Advisors a day before International Women’s Day. “Fearless Girl” represents the call-to-action to increase the number of women on corporate boards. President and CEO of SSGA Ron O’ Hanley The statue will stand in front of the Wall Street bull for at least a week (video by webbitz)

The world’s third-largest asset manager has installed a bronze statue of a defiant girl in front of Wall Street’s iconic charging bull statue as part of its new campaign to pressure companies to add more women to their boards.

State Street Global Advisors, a nearly $2.5 trillion investor and unit within State Street Corp., is rolling out the campaign ahead of International Women’s Day on March 8.

The huge money manager said it would vote against boards if a company failed to take steps to increase its number of members who are women. State Street plans to send a letter to 3,500 companies on Tuesday asking the companies to take action…. (more)

I am happy to share this young girl’s public show of defiance on Day without a Woman. We need some hope and this gives us some.

How to get involved with ‘A Day Without a Woman’ — even if you’re working

  • Wear red
  • Participate in a rally(more)

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Is San Francisco Losing Its DNA?

By Stefanie Doucette : thebolditalic – excerpt

The iconic DNA Lounge club may be facing the end of its days.

… Currently, the interior of DNA Lounge is looking a little grim and stressed. Jamie flips over a chair to examine a wobby leg and fiddles with it. He’s working hard to fix a lot of things. No one there is trying to hide the fact that the club is in a hard spot, despite seeing moments of massive success over the years: public recognition from Mayor Newsom in 2010, multiple Best of the Bay awards and stage appearances from some of the most famous musical acts in the world.

“We need a quick fix because I am out of money. I can’t make long-term investments because I don’t know how I’m keeping the lights on in the short term.”…

San Francisco has harbored counterculture communities for decades. Where did they all go?

A lot of them are at DNA Lounge — those who have found it, anyway. It’s in the heart of SOMA, at the intersection of 11th Street and Howard, next to Slim’s and along the path of the Folsom Street Fair. To get there you have to walk past several blocks of tents made from plastic tarp and old furniture, strung up underneath the concrete pillars where 101 meets I-80. Over the years, the streets around DNA Lounge have seen these shanty towns grow in proportion to the shiny condos towering over them(more)

No matter which city you live in or near, the gentrification factor is present along with the growing shantytowns, now tent cities. Look around you and you will see the dying DNAs amid the soulless towers and homeless encampments. Who do citizens turn this trend around? We are looking at LA and their Measure S to slow development in that city for answers. In a few hours we will know if they won or lost the battle.

RELATED:

An Elegy for Caffe Med, One of the Last Outposts of 1960s Counterculture (Photos)

The iconic Berkeley hangout — where Black Panthers held meetings and Allen Ginsberg penned “Howl” — closes its doors for good

Telegraph Avenue has been in flux (some might say decline) for decades as long-standing businesses capitulate to fast-food eateries and chain retail. The biggest blow was probably when Cody’s Books closed.

Cody’s Books — along with Moe’s Books, Shakespeare & Co, and Black Oak Books — was a core member of the group of independent booksellers clustered around the north end of Telegraph. Alice Walker, Salman Rushdie, Maurice Sendak and Norman Mailer, among others, all did readings at Cody’s. During the tumult of the ’60s and early ’70s, the store served as a shelter and first-aid station for anti-Vietnam protesters. Its closure in 2006 was widely perceived as the beginning of the end for the avenue’s local and independent businesses. And of the four major bookstores formerly located on and around Telegraph, only Moe’s survives (more)

Ok. This is seriously sad. Caffe med was the first coffee shop I experienced in Berkeley when I got to California. I probably had my first late there.

George Saunders Has Some Thoughts About Art in the Trump Era

The hallowed short story author, who recently published his debut novel, explains the difference between our “art minds” and “media minds,” and why we need to pay attention to the former…

Read the entire interview here. I am only concerned with the conversation about art and media. Ellisa questions are in bold text. George answers in regular text.

Despite the fact that the novel is set 150 years ago, it feels very timely. A president, a profoundly good man, is grieving the lives lost in the war between the North and South, the country being torn apart and wrestling with his faith and that image of the distraught father cradling his young dead son. It made me think of President Obama, and all the young men killed by gun violence.

It’s so funny, the way art works. You’re concentrating on the machinery—the linguistic details of the speeches, and moving the characters around and then a system of meaning emerges from that, almost of its own volition. In this case, the material became much darker and sadder than I thought it would be. But it also gave me some truths I wasn’t expecting.

We do love things that go away. We might say, “Oh, God, please just let me die first!” But then you realize: “If I go first, that doesn’t mean the people I love won’t eventually have to die. It just means I won’t be there to have to witness it.” So anyway you cut it, it’s bleak. So . . . then what? How do we live in the face of the bleakness, and how do we live, even, with joy in the face of the bleakness?

I’m curious about the nonfiction piece you did for The New Yorker, “Who are All These Trump Supporters?”.  There seems to be some overlap between that dystopian America you satirize in your early stories that have working class folks at the mercy of capitalism and commercialism, and the Trump supporters in the article.

In my 20s I was really deep in working-class life—I worked as a roofer and in a slaughterhouse. These were my people. So it was fun and difficult to get out there and have a little bit of a confusion about competing parts of myself— the former working stiff versus the current liberal softie. Part of me just wanted to nail that movement, but then there are these nice people, who weren’t used to being interviewed, and weren’t political power players. They were just at a rally. It feels like a really complicated mathematical equation. What produces a Trump supporter? When, to me, everything he stands for just seems wrong. I haven’t figured it out yet… (more)

This week, the folks in Lowell, Massachusetts will celebrate the life of one of their most famous artists and a Florida favorite, Jack Kerouac. How surprised would he be to be remembered in this day of a new anti-art movement. How daunting would this be for Thomas Reese, after joyful years of expanded freedoms to be painted back into the cold prison of suppression. What do these cycles of social injustice and repression tell us about the human condition and psyche? Where does this need to curb our freedoms come from?

Continue reading “George Saunders Has Some Thoughts About Art in the Trump Era”

Groove not approved: permit denied for Summer of Love 50th anniversary party

by Julia Carrie Wong : theguardian – excerpt

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Plans to celebrate a pivotal moment in San Francisco’s hippie history have been quashed after city cited safety concerns – and people says it’s not cool, man

The Human Be-In rally that touched off the Summer of Love in San Francisco’s Golden Gate Park on 14 January 1967 may have been a psychedelic, hippy-dippy, drug-addled, free-love, damn-the-man love-fest, but it did have one thing going for it: a permit.

Fifty years later, San Franciscans can order delivery of a joint with an app and marry a same-sex partner at city hall, but bureaucratic approval for a concert celebrating the 50th anniversary of the Summer of Love is out of reach.

On 7 February, the San Francisco recreation and parks department denied a permit to the anniversary concert in a harsh letter to concert organizer Boots Hughston, citing his “numerous ‘misrepresentations of material fact’” in his dealings with the department.

“The Summer of Love was an incredible moment in our city’s history and its message of peace and love is more important than ever,” the department wrote, citing concerns over safety before adding: “We cannot put the public at risk and grant a permit for your proposed event.”.

The denial is a major setback for Hughston, who had been planning to host a free day-long concert featuring, among others, Eric Burdon and War, Country Joe McDonald, and the remaining members of Jefferson Airplane. Hughston, who previously organized a 40th anniversary Summer of Love concert, had hoped to secure an appearance by the Dalai Lama to this year’s celebration but, he said, “his holiness was booked in LA”.

“The whole thing about the 50th anniversary is that we are marking our generation and what our generation accomplished,” Hughston said. “We impeached presidents. We started all these movements: the environmental movement, the free speech movement, the feminist movement.”

“It’s because the whole generation woke up and realized that there was more to life than just working everyday and spending your whole life sitting at a desk,” he added…

Representatives of the city and the mayor’s office did not immediately respond to queries from the Guardian… (more)

When we say we are losing the heart and soul of San Francisco, this is what we mean. If your city is experiencing similar loses let us know and we will post those stories as well.

There appears to be an international effort to erase our past by erasing our cultural heritage. It feels as if we are following in the footsteps of some of the most hated despots in history in these efforts to re-write the past.

This is not coming from the Trump regime. This started long before Trump took office. This strategy started long ago.

If San Francisco cancels the FREE Summer of Love concert people should boycott San Francisco.